Saturday, August 20, 2011

Trust and Washing

Yesterday for our 'Big Group' (an hour each week all spend together talking about whatever is on the 'table') we took 2  1/2 hrs. Peter was leading and we were on the goal of building trust within the group. So we did some trust exercises. The first one trusting someone to catch you when you fall backwards into them. The second one is to form a circle with someone in the middle and that person keeps their feet planted in one spot and falls toward the circle of people around them and they roll you around the circle without letting you fall. The third one is where you fall backwards into the arms of about 10 people from about a 6 ft. height with someone laying on the ground under the arms that you are falling into.
Trust - do you trust those who will catch you.
Trust - do you trust those that are catching the person dropping down onto you.
Trust - do you trust the person falling, that they will keep their arms tucked and not spread them out as they fall and hit you as you catch them.
After everyone was given a chance to be in each of the different positions, we then stood around and talked about it. It was something that even the staff had not done. So for all it was a learning experience.

So today is cleaning day!

We have clothes to wash and sheets and the floor in our room is needing a washing too. Below is Rebecca, one of our fellow students, helping us do our wash. She learned a few more English words, we can communicate but it is limited. God Bless you Rebecca!
I have a lot to learn about how to wash here. Our clothes have been washed each week by us, but I think that they are much cleaner this week than they've been since we've come! Rebecca, you're a dear!

2 comments:

  1. Marlene Pannenbecker says:
    washing clothes takes on a whole new meaning in these countries...my hands have never hurt so much in my life as the when we had to "handwash" our clothes for a few weeks. They can wring them out so good...mine NOT so much !!! (lol) The kids would shake their heads at me, push me over and do it for me...I think it was painful for them to watch - same as wringing out the mops by hand (yuck) I was horrible at it and they (with their little hands) would just take it, do it and give it back to me with that LOOK as they handed it back...lol lol

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  2. LOL, It's a learning experience. They don't use mops here at the base. I've seen them in the stores, but they use (what I would call) squeegees. They are like a broom but instead of bristles there is a black rubber that you slide along the floor to move the water along to the drain.

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